You ever think about completely changing careers?

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by Chainblade, May 29, 2008.

  1. Chainblade

    Chainblade Junior Member

    Messages:
    3,841
    Trophy Points:
    53
    so I graduated college in 2004. it's been 4 years since then. Ya I've got a better job doing help desk for Boeing but ultimately, I'm still sitting on my ass talking to people over the phone making $15/hour.

    I've never liked talking on the phone (people are lot more rude over the phone than in person) and since I've started working out regularly since February, I am really tired of sitting for 8 hours a day. i've always wanted a hands on computer job but those are hard to get. In the seattle area, at least, there are too many people and not enough jobs for good IT jobs. The ones that I do hear about, I apply to. sometimes I get some interest but usually not. I don't have any certs besides Blackberry certs, which I know will help but I can't afford them and I suck at written tests. I can do the work fine if they would do hands on tests. I'm also an extremely fast learner so even if there isn't something I know, I can learn it fast. Within the first few weeks here at Boeing, I had same or better stats than everybody there.

    Anywho, I know some of you might be thinking, "oh just keep waiting for that good job" or "just get your certs." well it's easier said than done and I'm not sure if I can stand it any longer sitting on the phones all day. My love for computers is really starting to go down hill since I haven't been able to work on them hands on. If I could get that hands on job, I'd take it and be happy. i just don't see it anytime soon and want to do something besides sitting on a phone. I was thinking of a complete career change. Lots of things interest me. I've thought about being a carpenter, doing something in automotive, doing something in the medical field, being in security or a policeman, doing something like a personal trainer (although they get paid usually only on commission, which won't work for me).

    I don't know. any of you guys feel this way about your life? I feel I'm wasting my life away sitting on the phones. I want to really do something with my life and make a change soon as sitting on the phones is stressing me out and I just don't have the mental or physical means of doing it anymore. what do you all think? and be nice :D
  2. MSP

    MSP Haunting a dead forum...

    Messages:
    29,575
    Trophy Points:
    78
    Yeah, I've made a big change in direction before. I was focused on medicine until I was about 25, at which point I switched to IT work. For me I just sorta fell into it. One day I decided "I'm not happy doing this. What do I enjoy, and what am I really good at?" At the intersection of both I found computers, so I got a job in the hospital data center as a grunt assistant operator.

    You already covered the certs thing, which I still say is a great way to advance. But more important than that by far is to network. Do you know any people in business management positions, or that do IT work?
  3. Chainblade

    Chainblade Junior Member

    Messages:
    3,841
    Trophy Points:
    53
    ya i know certs will help. like i said, there is just so many problems with getting certs. Number one, I can't afford it. Even if I can save up, It would take a couple months just to save for each one. it would take me forever to get them all done. and i suck at the tests so ya if I fail, I'd have to save enough more money and even more time. and even with certs, I'm not guranteed to get a hands on job. So IF I went that route, it would take many months and a lot of money to do it. There are so many people I work with (even at my old cell phone tech support job) that have MSCE, CISCO, and every other cert you can imagine but they aren't getting the jobs either because they just aren't out there really. so if one comes along, I wouldn't have a chance compared to them. I just don't want to continue to take tech calls over the phone for god knows how long until I get my certs and I have the POSSIBILITY of getting a better job.

    I can't take it much longer. sitting in a cubicle and talking on the phone for 4+ years takes its toll on ya. I don't know how many of you have worked in a call center but it's brutal. There is something about it that is mentally and physically exhausting. Most people I know that work in call centers are loaded on some sort of medications to keep them sane, they drink alot, and/or do some other drugs to not go insane.

    I don't really have too many contacts that I know. I'm not one that makes friends easily so ya. I have a few, but, again, it doesn't seem to help much :(
  4. Mince

    Mince Never Dice, Always Mince!

    Messages:
    2,237
    Trophy Points:
    53
    Location:
    Miami, FL
    You should join LinkedIn.com...

    Great site to communicate and socialize with profressions in certain industries...
  5. MSP

    MSP Haunting a dead forum...

    Messages:
    29,575
    Trophy Points:
    78
    What was your major?
  6. Chainblade

    Chainblade Junior Member

    Messages:
    3,841
    Trophy Points:
    53
    Computer Network Technology
  7. MSP

    MSP Haunting a dead forum...

    Messages:
    29,575
    Trophy Points:
    78
    Well fuck! Get that resume updated and start looking. With a degree in an IT related field you shouldn't be answering phones for a living. Any opportunity to move around at Boeing?
  8. gB dAvId x

    gB dAvId x thats what she said

    Messages:
    5,440
    Trophy Points:
    53
    Location:
    sacramento, california
    Maybe try and get a job with the state? That's what I"m currently doing part time but once I have my bachelors in MIS I plan on getting on full time
  9. Chainblade

    Chainblade Junior Member

    Messages:
    3,841
    Trophy Points:
    53
    i update my resume everytime there is a change. trust me, I'm real anal about it. it's always up to date. and I apply to jobs every week. there just aren't a lot out there and the ones that I do apply for, I usually don't get contacted or I don't get the job if I happen to get an interview.

    like I said, I know my credentials are good enough to get a better job in other states but here in the washington area, it's very difficult. when i was doing tech support for cell phone companies, many people there had tons of certs, bachelor degrees, master degrees, etc. the IT field is tough here. lot of us deserve not be talking on the phone but it's all that we can get here in Washington. You are taking for granted that where you live, it's easy to get a hands on job :D
  10. MSP

    MSP Haunting a dead forum...

    Messages:
    29,575
    Trophy Points:
    78
    How about relocating? And if you were to change careers, what would you like to do?
  11. Undertaker989

    Undertaker989 New Member

    Messages:
    1,614
    Trophy Points:
    0

    Don't worry. You're meeting the world halfway man. Don't be delusional and think that a 4 year degree means you should easily have a good job quickly....it simply is not the case. Everyone has a degree these days. Its no meal ticket.

    Just never give up, keep the end goal in mind, keep food on the table while looking higher, and never feel pressured into taking a crappy job or crappy pay if you currently have food on the table. Keep looking forward and eventually you will get there.
  12. Chainblade

    Chainblade Junior Member

    Messages:
    3,841
    Trophy Points:
    53
    i couldn't afford to relocate even if I wanted to. I've looked into it. I wouldn't be able to afford to move. at least not now.

    as far as what I would want to do. tons of things interest me. i've thought about being a carpenter, doing something in automotive, doing something in the medical field, being in security or a policeman, doing something like a personal trainer. some more problems are created as I have never done any building so I don't know if I could get a job like that or if I would do well at it. I've never worked on vehicles before so I'd have to go to college for that (which I can't afford or have the time for). Security or policeman I could do. you don't need any special things for that? not sure if I could pass whatever tests they make you take though. personal trainer would be fun but you need at least a cert for that and they usually are paid on comission. also, I wouldn't be able to afford a paycut (or at least not much of one) from what I make now.
  13. MSP

    MSP Haunting a dead forum...

    Messages:
    29,575
    Trophy Points:
    78
    Well from my experience you should avoid becoming a security guard. They make less than you do now, and are treated like shit but everyone.
  14. Chainblade

    Chainblade Junior Member

    Messages:
    3,841
    Trophy Points:
    53
    oh i know that having a college degree isn't any kind of gurantee. and really the whole never give up thing is dandy but at what point do you give up? sitting in a cubicle on the phone all day is stressful, mentally and physically exhausting like I said before. I've been doing it since college. it doesn't get any better. I have the better job with actually working with computers over the phone instead of cell phones but I feel the same way. I hate it. everybody who does call center jobs hates it. i applaud you undertaker if you have the mental toughness to be able to continue to wait while feeling like crap but I just can't do this any longer. I am competing for entry level hands on computer jobs with people that have every cert in the world, master degrees, 20 years experience, etc. it's no joke. that's how bad it is here. nobody is going to hire me over someone like that, would you? hell no. and I don't have the time or money to get all those certs, college education, etc....especially while continuing to sit on the phones all day.

    i graduated college at the worst time here. in 2004, the IT market became so incredibly saturated. I worked for OfficeMax for a few months after I graduated college. then I got the cell phone tech support job, which was an upgrade in pay and tech support experience (however the job was more stressful than officemax, that's for sure). i had hoped I would only be at that place for 6 months. i was there for 2 years and was treated like garbage, along with everybody else there that was way way overqualified to work there. if they couldn't get a real job, how did I have a chance? i applied to every tech job I found out about. finally got the Boeing job in February. It's certainly better than what I was doing. I was super excited as you guys know since I posted it here. but I've been here 4 months and it's basically the same crap I was doing, just more computer related. i still sit in a cubicle and talk on the phone. it's no fun. pretty much all of us that work here want to get out and into a hands on job. it's just not as easy as you might think. you wouldn't understand unless you lived here.

    do I believe I could eventually get that hands on computer job? Ya. but as each day goes by that I am still talking on the phones, the more and more I want to quit and do something else. It could take years until I get a good computer job. I don't know if I can wait that long working in this current environment. Life goes by too fast to just sit in a cubicle talking on the phone...
  15. Chainblade

    Chainblade Junior Member

    Messages:
    3,841
    Trophy Points:
    53
    security guards get paid fairly decent here. starting at like $13/hour. it would suck to take the pay cut initially but they also get more money if they get certain "certs" themselves. plus I wouldn't be sitting on the phone in a cubicle. i get treated like shit anyways lol. people tend to treat people worse over the phone than in person...
  16. mistawiskas

    mistawiskas kik n a and takin names

    Messages:
    30,063
    Trophy Points:
    98
    Location:
    Rogue Valley Oregon
  17. Torx

    Torx Indigenous Nudist

    Messages:
    19,341
    Trophy Points:
    88
    moving up at fedex is next to impossible considering the millions of employees trying to bid on the same fucking job.

    i wanna leave but ive already invested 8 years into the company, and have worked pretty damn hard to get my current pay rate. I dunno, i think about it but i cant take the job switching risk right now with my current financial situations.. If anything i'll get a second job thats part time or with flexible hours.
  18. JustinL

    JustinL Junior Member

    Messages:
    1,787
    Trophy Points:
    53
    Why not try and get some sort of technical training and build/repair parts for Boeing. Look around your company and see if you could get a job assembling electronics for aircraft? I would imagine that they would love to hire someone to work on the assembly line who knows how stuff really works. If you have made a good impression on your current superiors, they would most likely put in a good word for you and companies like to hire from within. If you could get some sort of a job working on the assembly line, that would look great on your resume for trying to get a hands on job in the computer field.
  19. Jamsan

    Jamsan Junior Member

    Messages:
    1,650
    Trophy Points:
    53
    Location:
    Connecticut
    Have you talked to your manager/supervisor if there is any way to move up within the company? You say you're one of the top people and have only been there a few months. If this is true, they would be at a loss if they kept you pinned down to phones all day instead of being productive elsewhere.

    I know it's been brought up elsewhere, but have you thought about relocating? It would obviously be tough at first getting situated, being in an area you're not familiar with, no one you know around, etc., but you'd be doing things that enjoy, hopefully getting paid better, and furthering your career by getting "better" experience and hopefully higher pay to help achieve certs, etc.

    Also, while your buddies may have an MCSE, CCNA, and the rest of the alphabet soup, they may just be paper certs. Up until recently, the Microsoft exams were easily passible with brain dumps, memorizing etc. They may have all of these certs, but probably can't answer questions to save their lives during interviews. This is the case alot more than you think, so don't think that just because others who have certs aren't getting jobs, you won't with the same alphabet soup on your resume.

    From your previous posts, it appears that you are living paycheck to paycheck and barely scraping by, but try saving an extra $10-$20 a paycheck to put towards certifications. Cisco exams aren't very expensive (the CCNA single exam is around $150), Microsoft exams are cheap ($125ish each), but can get up their with the amount of exams required for MCSE/MCSA. I have a bunch of CBT videos that are pretty good for CCENT/CCNA, MCSE/A, etc. which I would be more than happy to share with you. With these and using VMWare/Virtual PC for the MS stuff and programs like Packet Tracer/RouterSim/Boson Network Simulator for Cisco stuff, you can get alot of the training/study materials for very little to no cost to help pass the exams. E-books are readily available for every subject imaginable and often "free". I don't condone piracy, but when it comes down to furthering your career or eating, the former is more easily available in the "free" format.
  20. Torx

    Torx Indigenous Nudist

    Messages:
    19,341
    Trophy Points:
    88
    trainsignal makes some great video instructionals.

    boeing has to have some nice job openings in the IT field.
    and im sure they might even be willing TO PAY for the cert exams given you pass them. Alot of companies actually pay for you to be trained and certified. So ask questions..

    the boson network sim is pretty cool i liked that one.
  21. Mince

    Mince Never Dice, Always Mince!

    Messages:
    2,237
    Trophy Points:
    53
    Location:
    Miami, FL
    Dude... I didn't know you worked at FedEx. I could have used your help a many times! I work at Alienware (like Bear) and coordinate A LOT of crap with FedEx...
  22. tweakmonkey

    tweakmonkey Webmaster Staff Member

    Messages:
    7,864
    Trophy Points:
    78
    This might be a little overboard / cheesy, but I thought about completely changing my career for almost a decade until I finally did it, and couldn't be happier with the results. Of all the things that got me inspired, these were some of my favorites:

    1) "If you wouldn't do your job for free, you're doing the wrong thing" -- (paraphrased) ... I remember reading that in a book one time, and it got me thinking. There are tons of things I *could* do, some would make good money, and many would be easy. But only a few things are that interesting to me (pretty much cars and video games). There's something out there for everyone.

    2) Steve Jobs' speech at Stanford to the graduates:
    YouTube - 01/02 - Steve Jobs Stanford Commencement Speech - 2005

    3) How to discover your life purpose in about 20 minutes
  23. SoulAssassin

    SoulAssassin Car Ramrod

    Messages:
    4,656
    Trophy Points:
    53
    Location:
    Cincinnati, OH
    I really, really agree with Jamsan here. While you really don't need certs to move up it certainly helps when switching jobs. Your best bet is to show competence to your manager. Even if you don't pass your certs you can still show you're the best at what you do. Our "best" guy has zero certs and a GED (i think) but because he's able to show excellence at topics we need and he's been promoted. You'd be surprised the amount of A+ guys that don't even know the difference in RAM speeds.

    Also, don't give up after 4 months. I do work for a small company and for 3 years I worked inside our company doing phone support, remote computer support and customer service. I promise, listening to customers bitch and moan about bills and technical competence is a pain in the ass but if you show you can handle it you'll be better for it. Hell I worked in a promotion because of it (granted, small company, but I hope you get the idea).

    edit: if you need any materials that I may have (some MCSE/CISCO stuff, let me know) and I can help ya out.
  24. smirnoff

    smirnoff Curmudgeon

    Messages:
    4,583
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Location:
    Winnipeg, MB
    I can only imagine how frustrating is it to get caught in that need-experience-for-work-but-need-work-for-experience loop. Perhaps a creative solution: Here is one, Start sending in resumes with a note explaining that you'll work for, say, 3 months at minimum wage... during which time you prove to them you're worthy. At the end of the six months they increase your pay the normal wage, or let you go. Anything to get your foot in the door. Even if you go through a few 3 month stints, you still have gained much.

    My own experience with career switching has been positive. For those interested.... I was living in Vancouver and currently one year into an auto tech apprenticeship, got the opportunity to try day trading in a office opening in Winnipeg. I moved that same month. I figured I had nothing to lose but money and time. If it didn't work I'd come back and pick up where i left off, big deal. The shitty parts were; leaving an amazing city, to a dump of a city; living with 3 other aspiring traders in a tiny 2 br appartment; trying to stretch the 5000 dollars I came with to pay the bills until I started making money trading (which took well over a year)(no cable, no phone, no internet, no car, no life); even my second year I'd say I averaged min wage.
    It's been a little over 3 years now since I've started, and I very please with how things are going. Pleased and thankful. The job I love, I always have. At some point during the second year I took a chance and began renting my own 1 bedroom apartment (ahhh, luxury baby!!!). I figured if I really took care I could survive about 8 months of living costs if the trading income suddenly stopped, luckily that didn't happen. Since then I've added some comforts like a computer, a laptop, internet, a cell phone, a netflix account, furnature, some trips back home, and a modest social life. I still live pretty modestly because my current requirements to be happy are merely to be able to relax, buy a new book now and again, and figure out how to keep making money at work (which is a deeply fulfilling, challenging and satisfying practice).

    I'd recommend taking a major chance Chainblade. Not because my own experience was positive, but because you'd risk little and gain much.
  25. Undertaker989

    Undertaker989 New Member

    Messages:
    1,614
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Well, I have so much I can say about this subject/situation that I don't have time to type it all right now...I might get around to it this weekend.