Green Workshop - Natural Living. (pix galore)

Discussion in 'Gearhead Garage' started by mistawiskas, May 13, 2009.

  1. tweakmonkey

    tweakmonkey Webmaster Staff Member

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    Where are you storing the wood chips? Are you going to use them for heating or garden mulch or?
  2. mistawiskas

    mistawiskas kik n a and takin names

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    Green matter gets recycled into the garden, wood will get recycled back into the forrest and into the landscaping. I pass a horse ranch almost daily. There's a pile of horseshit/road-apples sitting there next to a front-end loader. I think I'll ask that ol' boy if he'd let me have about 3 yards of the stuff to mix into the garden at fall tilling.
  3. mistawiskas

    mistawiskas kik n a and takin names

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    I didn't get horshit for the garden. instead, i got a literal (4X) shit ton of cowshit!!!!

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    Yesterday I tore down the garden. i tilled in 2 cubic yards of compost and raked it then spread rotted grass hay from the field. The hay was the stuff from that old picture from last summer.

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    I even got the addition to the barn painted ( Fiddy ;) ), the stove set in it's spot and gutters up. It was a busy weekend.

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  4. ninefivezero

    ninefivezero infinite resolution

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    Lookin' good!

    what's that red stove for? I must have missed something.
  5. mistawiskas

    mistawiskas kik n a and takin names

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    It's my shop stove. I'll be running ridgid 4" duct from it to the window behind it. There I have a supe quiet squirrel cage fan to pull the hot air in. There is a plenum around this stove and a flange to connect a duct in the back. This way I don't have to take up valuable shop space to burn my woodscraps and I get a heated shop. It will also facilitate snowmelt off of the tin roofs. I still need to get some catch basins for rainwater. I'll probably go with a 750 gallon and a 500 gallon tanks. Unless craigslist comes through with a deal I can't refuse :unibrow:
  6. Miller

    Miller Tweak Guru

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    4 inch seems kinda small, make sure to insulate it too, R-8
  7. mistawiskas

    mistawiskas kik n a and takin names

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    I ended up going with a 5" duct, and yes, It will get insulated. I just now ducted and hooked up the squirrel cage to a switched outlet. I'll get the stovepipe hooked up and braced tomorrow, then i can fire this sucker up.
    Fire season ended today and I'm itching to see what kind of heat I can get from this. Pix later.
  8. mistawiskas

    mistawiskas kik n a and takin names

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    There, woodstove set up and it woiks! A 115watt (1ampX115volt) heater foe the barn.

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  9. Octane91

    Octane91 <smartass comment> Staff Member

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    If you don't mind me asking, how does that heater work?
  10. Miller

    Miller Tweak Guru

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    looks good wiskas, you will get better results if you duct a return into the shop. your going to be pulling outside air in, say its -20 out, your only going to be blowing 80° air inside, if you duct a return and are pulling say, 60° air with a 100° rise you will be blowing 160° air. just examples, most furnaces don't give a 100° rise, usually 50-60°.
  11. mistawiskas

    mistawiskas kik n a and takin names

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    That thing heats the shop burning a handfull of newspapers. there's a plenum on the back of the stove that squirrel cage used to be hooked to to blow air acrost the top of the stove like a heat-a-lator. Now I pull air through the plenum, off the top of the stove and then pipe it into the shop. The top of that stove boils water burning just paper for 4-5 minutes so it's hot enough. The air coming out of the duct is in the neighborhood of 90-105 degrees with an ambient temp of 49 when i burn wood scraps in the stove. Heated the whole shop in 3 minutes flat, then I had to turn off the blower and damper the stove. There is no insulation in the shop, just bare stud walls and the heat sufficed for a half hour. That old shop stove is like a blast furnace and starts really easily. Running hot there is absolutely no smoke from the flupipe even with rain dampened woodscraps. It burns almost too hot for this setup. Small fires from here on out I guess.

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    PS, the really good part? I got the stove for free and the rest cost under 40 bux!!! And fuel is free;).
    Octane91 says thanks for this.
  12. -=Lurker=-

    -=Lurker=- **BANNED**

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    So you're pulling in the air off the top of the flames? You might wanna box the plenum in with some steel plate on the stove side and pull air in from the same room (return as Miller said). That way you don't introduce harmful gasses and soot into the shop thus still get warm air. A heat-exchanger in other words... my 2 cents.
  13. Octane91

    Octane91 <smartass comment> Staff Member

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    it looks like those small slit vents don't actually pull the air over the flames, they just pull it over the outer wall of the stove thus heating the air.
  14. -=Lurker=-

    -=Lurker=- **BANNED**

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    Yeah, now that I look at it again, you're right. ;)
  15. mistawiskas

    mistawiskas kik n a and takin names

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    octane has it. The top of the stove gets really hot and boils water very well. it warms my coffee mug up in no time.....think i'll invest in a porcelained steel camp mug.
    i do shut the blower down when i open it up to refuel so i don't pump smoke into the shop. I'm rigging a reostat to the blower to slow it down so i can control the amount of air pulled acrost the top of the stove and stovepipe. Later, after spring, I'll harvest some tobaco and dry it this way while alowing some smoke to flavor the tobacco cure. i'm thinking peach or cherrywood, maybe some hickory. I'm fasioning pipes out of cherry burl right now. Tobbacco taxes? I don't think so. A buddy is having a good amount of luck growing: Dark Virginia Tobacco Seeds in this climate. i want to experiment with a fast, hardy variety: Stag Horn Tobacco Seeds DIY FTW!
  16. mistawiskas

    mistawiskas kik n a and takin names

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    As posted in the "halloween eve" thread. I had to move that pile o' shit, spead it and decided to use the rotovator to make more garden space while I had use of the tractor.
    That was alot of shit mainard!

    before:

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    after:


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    next, it's all about building a greenhouse. I'll be putting it at the point farthest away from the cottage because the sun shines out there most the day in the winter.
  17. Torx

    Torx Indigenous Nudist

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    very nice. you do all this by yourself or do you get any help or assistance?
    the heater is a one man job yes, but what about the addition and any other structural additions?
  18. mistawiskas

    mistawiskas kik n a and takin names

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    All by my onesies :). I've been a loaner most of my life. A person learns to do a bunch of things by themselves that normal people would require assistance with. For instance. I set all these beams 12 foot off the ground by myself:


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    It pays to study how the Egyptians did things. ;)
  19. -=Lurker=-

    -=Lurker=- **BANNED**

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    So the aliens helped you?
  20. mistawiskas

    mistawiskas kik n a and takin names

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    Nope, I asked them, they said: "whatever man", so I proceeded without assistance of any kind.
  21. mistawiskas

    mistawiskas kik n a and takin names

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    So......today, I decided to get to work on that greenhouse.
    It's going to be 10'X12'.

    The skids it'll sit on:

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    i decided to do the frame like trusses rather than stud and plate. Attempting to see if I can build these competitively.

    7 trusses:

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    If this design works out, I'll have my buddy down at the truss mill make them up for future jobs. Several people have shown interest in a custom built greenhouse. Now I'll have a model to show them. It'd be rather cool to build these full time and perhaps offer premade kits for the DIY'ers.

    I'm going to use 20 pieces of 12'X2' corrugated polucarbonate for the UV protection it offers. That shit is hella expensive though. 30 frigging bux a pop. 20 of them to do this smallish 10'X12' greenhouse. you can do the math. So far materials are coming in at 800 bux. probably another 100 bux yet to go. i could have used 6mil clear visquene, but who wants to replace the covering every year. Besides, If I can sell two, i get mine almost for free. Good profit comes after the sale of the third one.
  22. mistawiskas

    mistawiskas kik n a and takin names

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    Today, the frame and purlins. I got 80% of the framing done and 85% of the floor in.

    taking shape now:

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  23. -=Lurker=-

    -=Lurker=- **BANNED**

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    Pretty damn cool. You're like the T3D Bob Vila. I love it. :D Keep the updates coming.

    Are you gonna plumb the greenhouse for irrigation? Where's the water coming from? Details my man. ;)
  24. Octane91

    Octane91 <smartass comment> Staff Member

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    How long will that wood last?
  25. mistawiskas

    mistawiskas kik n a and takin names

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    That is the pumphouse right behind it and I have all the drip irrigation parts I'll need. I'm drawing power from that pumphouse too. There is going to be a thermostatically controled fan inside the greenhouse. Once the wood dries out enough (after the GH is done) I'll preserve the wood with a waterbased sealer so it'll last a long time. I stretched a 6mil sheet of visquene acrost the floor joists as a vapor barrier befor laying down 3/4"
    marine A-grade plywood. The whole thing is built on skids and attatched to the runners with hurricane clips. This way I can move it by pulling it with a tractor or my truck , if the need arises.